TWO LARGEST SCHOOL DISTRICTS FAIL IN IOWA SCHOOL REPORT CARD

4-19-17

Greetings, State Legislature Education Committee Members, Des Moines and Cedar Rapids School Officials, IASB and all—

IASB—Please forward this post to all school boards.  Thank  you very much. 

Ms. Day—Please forward this post to Cedar  Rapids school board members and all district administrators. 

Iowalive net workers analyzed and put the Iowa School Report Card  posting on http://reports.educateiowa.gov/schoolreportcard to unique use for the 57 schools in the Des Moines and 31  schools in the Cedar Rapids school districts.   They were found by clicking in the box shown in the  website and  scrolling down through the alphabetized list of schools in each district.   The Iowa School Report Card was developed by the Iowa Department of Education. It meets a legislative requirement and aligns with Department efforts to provide Iowans easier access to meaningful education statistics and to pair accountability and support for schools.    

The following chart shows the sorry state of ‘education’ in the State’s 2 largest school districts.  School officials chronically complained that student test scores did not show the whole picture of school performance.  As a result, the new Iowa School Report Card includes *8  areas of school performance, and they show the districts’ schools are even worse than their test scores posted on websites:   http://www.iowalive.net/readingallstested15-16.htm    http://www.iowalive.net/sciencegradestested15-16.htm  http://www.iowalive.net/mathgradestested15-16-2.htm 

The chart gives the percentage of the  schools in each district the system rates as  Exceptional, High-Performing, Commendable, Acceptable, Needs Improvement, and Priority. The ratings are based on each school’s performance over a two-year period on up to eight educational measures—explained in the Report Card.  No schools are rated exceptional and only 2 (4%) are high performing—and both are in the Des Moines district.  Only 1 (3%) school in Cedar Rapids is Commendable, and it is the best in the deplorable district.  Only 5 (9%) are Commendable in Des Moines.  So what  are district officials going to do about it, now that they know??!!  

They will blame everyone but themselves and howl for more money, of course.  That’s what they do!!!!

IOWA’S TWO LARGEST SCHOOL DISTRICTS ARE IN CRISIS

THEY OBVIOUSLY FAIL IN IOWA’S REPORT CARD

 

 

REPORT CARD DATA USED FOR ABOVE CHART

DES MOINES SCHOOL DISTRICT SCHOOLS--2016

SCHOOL

GRADE

RATING

Downtown School

Elementary

Commendable

Hubbell Elementary

Elementary

Commendable

Merrill Middle School

Middle

Commendable

Phillips Elementary

Elementary

Commendable

Samuelson Elementary School

Elementary

Commendable

Cowles Elementary School

Elementary

High-Performing

Pleasant Hill Elementary School

Elementary

High-Performing

Brody Middle School

Middle

Acceptable

Greenwood Elementary School

Elementary

Acceptable

Hanawalt Elementary

Elementary

Acceptable

Hillis Elementary School

Elementary

Acceptable

Jefferson Elementary School

Elementary

Acceptable

McCombs Middle School

Middle

Acceptable

Oak Park

Elementary

Acceptable

Perkins Elementary School

Elementary

Acceptable

Roosevelt High School

High

Acceptable

Studebaker Elementary School

Elementary

Acceptable

Windsor Elementary

Elementary

Acceptable

Wright Elementary School

Elementary

Acceptable

Brubaker Elementary School

Elementary

Needs Improvement

Callanan Middle School

Middle

Needs Improvement

Cattell Elementary School

Elementary

Needs Improvement

Edmunds Fine Arts Academy

Elementary

Needs Improvement

Garton Elementary

Elementary

Needs Improvement

Howe Elementary

Elementary

Needs Improvement

Lincoln High School

High

Needs Improvement

Lovejoy Elementary School

Elementary

Needs Improvement

Madison Elementary School

Elementary

Needs Improvement

McKinley Elementary School

Elementary

Needs Improvement

Meredith Middle School

Middle

Needs Improvement

Morris Elementary School

Elementary

Needs Improvement

Park Ave Elementary School

Elementary

Needs Improvement

South Union Elementary School

Elementary

Needs Improvement

Stowe Elementary School

Elementary

Needs Improvement

Walnut Street School

Elementary

Needs Improvement

Weeks Middle School

Middle

Needs Improvement

Willard Elementary School

Elementary

Needs Improvement

Capitol View Elementary School

Elementary

Priority

Carver Elementary

Elementary

Priority

East High School

High

Priority

Findley Elementary School

Elementary

Priority

Goodrell Middle School

Middle

Priority

Harding Middle School

Middle

Priority

Hiatt Middle School

Middle

Priority

Hoover High School

High

Priority

Hoyt Middle School

Middle

Priority

Jackson Elementary School

Elementary

Priority

King Elementary School

Elementary

Priority

Monroe Elementary School

Elementary

Priority

Moulton Elementary School

Elementary

Priority

North High School

High

Priority

River Woods Elementary School

Elementary

Priority

Scavo Alternative High School

High

Priority

Des Moines Central Campus High School

High

Unable to Rate

Orchard Place School

High

Unable to Rate

Ruby Van Meter School

High

Unable to Rate

Smouse Opportunity School

Elementary

Unable to Rate

 

CEDAR RAPIDS SCHOOL DISTRICT SCHOOLS--2016

Coolidge Elementary School

Elementary

Commendable

Cleveland Elementary School

Elementary

Acceptable

Erskine Elementary School

Elementary

Acceptable

George Washington High School

High

Acceptable

Grant Elementary School

Elementary

Acceptable

Harding Middle School

Middle

Acceptable

Hiawatha Elementary School

Elementary

Acceptable

Jackson Elementary School

Elementary

Acceptable

John F Kennedy High School

High

Acceptable

Kenwood Elementary School

Elementary

Acceptable

Madison Elementary School

Elementary

Acceptable

McKinley Middle School

Middle

Acceptable

Nixon Elementary School

Elementary

Acceptable

Pierce Elementary School

Elementary

Acceptable

Taft Middle School

Middle

Acceptable

Viola Gibson Elementary School

Elementary

Acceptable

Arthur Elementary School

Elementary

Needs Improvement

Franklin Middle School

Middle

Needs Improvement

Garfield Elementary School

Elementary

Needs Improvement

Grant Wood Elementary School

Elementary

Needs Improvement

Harrison Elementary School

Elementary

Needs Improvement

Hoover Elementary School

Elementary

Needs Improvement

Thomas Jefferson High School

High

Needs Improvement

Truman Elementary School

Elementary

Needs Improvement

Van Buren Elementary School

Elementary

Needs Improvement

Wright Elementary School

Elementary

Needs Improvement

Johnson Elementary School

Elementary

Priority

Metro High School

High

Priority

Roosevelt Middle School

Middle

Priority

Taylor Elementary School

Elementary

Priority

Wilson Middle School

Middle

Priority

 

*The ratings are based on the following educational measures provided by the Department of Education:  

Here is how a school’s overall rating is calculated  by Dept. of Education

School ratings represent a combination of scores on up to eight educational measures. Each measure has a value from 1 to 100, which is multiplied by the weight to create a score for each measure. The weighting is the value each indicator contributes to the overall score. The score for each measure is determined, and then all measures are added together to create an overall score. The overall score determines which performance rating the school is assigned. Each measure is based on data from the 2013-14 and 2014-15 school years.

Here is how the educational measures are weighted by Dept. of Education

The Proficiency, Closing Achievement Gap, and Growth measures are weighted equally, at about 20 percent (for a total of 60 percent). The Graduation Rate and College and Career Readiness measures are weighted at 10 percent each (for a total of 20 percent), and the final 20 percent is distributed across the remaining measures Attendance and Staff Retention.

The Report Card does not provide the numbers associated with each of the Exceptional, High-Performing, Commendable, Acceptable, Needs Improvement, and Priority ratings.   However, the Proficiency rating above is based on the 40Th National Percentile Rank (NPR), the lowest in the Midwest.  This means the Dept. of Education claims students are Proficient (Expert) when scoring as poorly as the bottom 40% of students in the U. S.  This is not stated in the Report Card,  for rather obvious reasons.  http://www.iowalive.net/howandwhyiowagotalowproficiencystandard.htm

Nearly as bad, the Report Card cited this Frequently Asked Question and gave the following devious Answer—when a more honest answer would be, Highly Likely. 

Frequently Asked Question:  My school received the lowest rating, “Priority.” Does this mean my child is getting a poor education?

Devious Answer--Just as students are not test scores, schools are not labels or data points. Iowa School Report Card ratings do not represent a complete picture of a school. The Iowa School Report Card is one tool to help Iowans understand how their schools are doing. Schools can use it to identify strengths and challenges, as well as strategies to address those challenges. Parents and community members can use it to celebrate areas of growth and ask questions, such as how a school is addressing a particular challenge and what they can do to help.

http://www.iowalive.net/schoolcrisis.htm

Sincerely,

Iowalive    A growing network of volunteer citizens and professionals for improving Iowa