IA REGENT UNIVERSITIES ARE DELINQUENT IN TEACHER TRAINING RESULTS

8-15--17

Greetings Iowa State Board of Regents and all—

This is the 6th in a series of superior educator Dr. Sue Atkinson’s posts on Iowa K-12 ‘education’ performance.  The first 5 are accessed with the following links.  This post  deals with the harmful impact of the percentage of defective student theory possessed by State Board of Regents' and their universities' failures to train teachers to teach effectively.

DEFECTIVE STUDENT THEORY PLAGUES IA BOARD OF EDUCATIONAL EXAMINERS

HARMFUL DEFECTIVE STUDENT THEORY IMPACT ON STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION

SPECIAL EDUCATION COSTS DRIVEN BY DEFECTIVE STUDENT THEORY

IOWA SCHOOLS INFLATE 'A' GRADES AND STUDENT PROFICIENCIES

RESPONSE TO 2nd ESSA DRAFT

Iowa’s public universities have failed, and continue failing, to adequately train teachers!!  And now ESSA (Every Student Succeeds Act) requires states to create a plan for accountability in meeting the educational needs of students.  Website  https://www.educateiowa.gov/article/2017/06/16/second-draft-iowa-s-essa-plan-released-public-review-feedback states ESSA Requirements and also shows Iowa’s flawed draft plan, that babbles eduspeak on and on and fails to meet them. 

UNI is Iowa’s teacher training university and it isn’t good enough to make the National Council  for Teacher Quality, (NCTQ) bottom of the barrel teacher training cut!!!

And Iowa, unfortunately, plans to continue to use the defective students theory to avoid being held accountable for the lack of responsibility in training teachers to effectively teach concepts (understanding not memorization) to the various student learning styles at grade level.  Iowa has responded in the following, quoted, totally flawed and unacceptable manner.  The more glaring flaws are high-lighted in yellow.  

https://www.educateiowa.gov/sites/files/ed/documents/K-6%20Early%20Literacy%20Alternate%20Assessment%20Manual.pdf 

Iowa Code section 279.68  and 281--Iowa Administrative Code 62 require that all students in kindergarten through third grade participate in universal screening in reading to determine their level of reading or reading readiness. This requirement includes students with the most significant cognitive disabilities who will or are likely to participate in alternate assessment based on alternate achievement standards in third grade. Because this group of students present a broad range of intensive and diverse needs, an alternate approach to assessment is required. For example, approximately 50% of students with the most significant cognitive disabilities cannot use speech well enough to read aloud, many others cannot hold pencils or use standard keyboards, and all experience a combination of cognitive and linguistic impairments that make it inappropriate for them to participate in standard assessments even with accommodations.

Unfortunately, there is no valid or reliable reading screener for students with significant cognitive disabilities. As such, the Iowa Department of Education issued Guidance on May 30, 2014 [Iowa Citation Code, 256B; Iowa Administrative Code citation – IAC 28162.3 (6)] that allows a district to, “Permit a student with a disability who has been determined to require an alternate assessment aligned to alternate academic achievement standards in reading to take an alternate reading assessment[1] that includes progress monitoring.

Here is the problem:  The law is irresponsibly crafted by poorly-trained educators who fail to understand that their poor training is the issue, not the abilities of the students they are failing to teach.  For decades, educators have scapegoated students rather than taken responsibility to effectively teach.  The states pushing Iowa down on NAEP rankings (from 12th in 2002 when NCLB was enacted, to 24th in 2015 when ESSA was significantly updated) have figured out this lapse in responsibility and are addressing it – but not Iowa.  Iowa educators want to continue avoiding accountability through the use of a bogus test and asking for a waiver.

In December 2016, the NCTQ (National Council on Teacher Quality) released another report with more specifics on elementary teacher training by states.  For Iowa, only the better programs are included, but they all fail to train teachers to effectively teach reading. 

Here is the link to the December 2016 report: http://www.nctq.org/dmsView/UE_2016_Landscape_653385_656245

This link provides the methods and overview.

http://www.nctq.org/teacherPrep/2016/findings/search.do?programId=1&range=90

The top ones in Iowa – including the University of Iowa (with the Iowa Reading Research Center attached to it) are failures at training teachers to effectively teach reading – AND at elementary content. Print screens from the report serve as evidence.

 

UNI is not on the list because they did not score high enough in the assessment. (Iowa is violating the rights of students by failing to take responsibility for ineffective teaching and falsely blaming the students for the situation).

Iowa’s education sector continues to believe the lie that struggling students are to blame rather than a defective system – contrary to evidence-based research: Dyslexia and Teacher Prep Dysfunction  study released 9 September 2016: http://www.nctq.org/commentary/article.do?id=290  and  The Dyslexia Dilemma: A History of Ignorance, Complacency and Resistance in Colleges of Education  http://childhood-developmental-disorders.imedpub.com/the-dyslexia-dilemma-a-history-of-ignorance-complacency-and-resistance-in-colleges-of-education.pdf   released in 2016.    

According to the National Council for Teacher Quality:

·      The critical role of the state is to make decisions and take actions for state-level policies and requirements that influence higher education institutions, because the state creates its own certification structure and determines what subjects each certification allows teachers to teach, as well as the standards used.

·      The selectivity, content requirements, oversight of student teaching, and provisions for methods courses are set according to policy, to avoid the continued graduation of teachers lacking in the knowledge of content, effective teaching techniques to the various learning styles, and classroom-management skills.

Iowa’s tight budget is wasting money on Special Ed because Iowa’s poorly-trained teachers fail to take responsibility for ineffective teaching methods, and Iowa’s State Board of Education and State Board of Educational Examiners allow them to continue to avoid taking responsibility – which means the ESSA plan for accountability is a farce (as Iowa’s education has been for decades). 

 DEFECTIVE STUDENT THEORISTS IN STATE BOARD OF REGENTS

The following table shows the harmful extent the defective student theorist have  penetrated and now influence the Board of Regents, which is less than other boards reported previously.  None of the three members hi-lighted in yellow have publicly raised significant issues about improving Iowa’s teacher training that is lacking in Iowa’s universities.

DEFECTIVE STUDENT THEORISTS IN STATE BOARD OF REGENTS

IOWA STATE BOARD OF REGENTS

AVERAGE % INFLUENCED BY DEFECTIVE STUDENT THEORY

Michael Richards. President

0%

Patty Cownie. President Pro Tem

35%

Sherry Bates

15%

Nancy Boettger

0%

Milt Dakovich

55%

Nancy Dunkel

65%

Rachael Johnson

1%

Larry McKibben

80%

AVERAGE

31%

Weighted Average--Defective Student Theorists Are Outnumbered And Less Influential Than Others

5%

 

Anyone claiming to have better numbers is asked to provide them

  

Sue Atkinson, PhD

P. O. Box 301

Baxter IA 50028

641-227-3786